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  #11  
Old June 13th, 2011, 10:17 AM
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Will this put Nuclear energy in a different light in design practices according to where they are built? (Not that it matters seeing that the entire planet is prone to Earthquakes...(Just thinking out loud here)...
It was the flooding, and failed back up systems that did them in. Makes one wonder how a portable emergency response by ship or barge would have fared? Portable Power Plant? Portable Pumping Station. If the radiation is contained, what is the downside of blasting it with CO2? What do I know? :
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Old June 13th, 2011, 10:43 AM
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Will this put Nuclear energy in a different light in design practices according to where they are built? (Not that it matters seeing that the entire planet is prone to Earthquakes...(Just thinking out loud here)...
This SHOULD help the regulatory passing of the Nuclear Battery type reactors. But don't count on it.
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  #13  
Old June 13th, 2011, 11:03 AM
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This SHOULD help the regulatory passing of the Nuclear Battery type reactors. But don't count on it.
First I've heard of them.

I found this.

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Designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spin-off Hyperion Power Generation Inc., the nuclear battery so called because it is cheap, small and easily transportable is about the size of a refrigerator, compared with a 50-ft.-tall traditional reactor. It produces 25 megawatts of electricity approximately a fortieth the output of a large atomic power-plant reactor. While not quite compact enough for cars, the battery, known as the Hyperion Power Module, has been designed to power subdivisions or towns with fewer than 20,000 homes, as well as military bases, mining operations, desalination plants and even commercial ships, including cruise liners.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...#ixzz1PAVzvYKS
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Old June 13th, 2011, 11:18 AM
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First I've heard of them.

I found this.
That's it. Toshiba has a version of this, it's a quantum leap in safety, reliability, cleanliness for the planet and efficiency. But nuclear regulatory crap has been trying to kill ALL nuclear power for 40 years, and this is no exception at all.
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Old June 15th, 2011, 10:37 AM
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TOKYO—Nine months before the March earthquake and tsunami cut off power to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, one of its reactors suffered a loss of electricity under much more mundane circumstances: A maintenance worker from a subcontractor accidentally bumped an electronic switch with his elbow.

The outage triggered a sharp drop in the level of cooling water for the radioactive fuel rods, according to the plant operator.

The little-noticed incident didn't result in any reactor damage or release of radiation. But it highlighted some of the vulnerabilities of the aging facility and raises questions about the precautionary procedures and outmoded equipment that operator Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, had in place.

According to Tepco's investigation, at 2:42 p.m. on June 17, 2010, an automatic shutdown set off an alarm in the control room of the No. 2 reactor, one of six at Fukushima Daiichi. Within minutes, control rods were inserted to stop the nuclear fission. But without electricity, the water pumps stopped supplying the reactor core with fresh water. Temperatures and pressure levels rose inside the reactor.

Tepco says no meltdown was imminent, and that normal water levels were restored soon after the power outage. Company officials say that emergency diesel-fuel generators were programmed to start automatically and that if the water inside the reactor had dropped 20 centimeters further, the emergency core cooling system, or ECCS, would have been triggered, preventing dangerous exposure of fuel rods.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...944570204.html
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Old June 15th, 2011, 10:39 AM
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TOKYO—A former inspector of Japan's nuclear plants has gone public with documents he says show slipshod practices by government regulators, as their stewardship comes under fire in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident.

Setsuo Fujiwara, now 62 years old, started filing complaints in July 2009 with the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization about what he considered lax safety-management practices, and later that year took his complaints to the nation's main nuclear-regulatory body, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, or NISA. Mr. Fujiwara says JNES forced him into an early retirement in March 2010.

He filed a civil lawsuit against the inspection agency in Tokyo District Court last August to get his job back. JNES has said in court filings he was let go for poor work performance. A JNES spokesman declined to comment. Mr. Fujiwara says he was wrongly terminated because of his whistle-blowing.

As part of his lawsuit, Mr. Fujiwara has included in public court filings documents he says are internal JNES reports illustrating mistakes by agency inspectors.

Among the documents is a log shared among inspectors of problems discovered at reactors. Mr. Fujiwara says the log was compiled by inspectors directly involved in the cases and by officials in charge of maintaining the log within the inspection department, and was used by JNES to monitor problems. Also included were email exchanges between Mr. Fujiwara and his supervisors related to a dispute he had with them over reporting tests results at a reactor in northern Japan.

In the court case, JNES didn't comment on the authenticity of the log, which couldn't be independently verified, but JNES accused Mr. Fujiwara of improperly disclosing internal confidential materials.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...727192828.html
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Old June 17th, 2011, 10:11 AM
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Friday, June 17, 2011


Month before fuel rods are cooled, stable
Tepco starting work to clean cooling water of radiation
Kyodo
Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Friday it will take a month to start circulating radioactive water cleaned using a newly installed water treatment system to cool the Fukushima No. 1 plant's crippled reactors.





Tepco also said it will require about a month for spent fuel rods in the storing pools at four reactor buildings to be cooled in a stable manner.

Meanwhile, the utility said there will be no change in its road map, which projects a cold shutdown being achieved by January.

Due to the growing number of workers at the site exposed to high levels of radiation, Tepco added to its tasks improving their working environment.

Also Friday, Tepco was set to start full-scale operation of the system to clean the highly radioactive water accumulating at the damaged Fukushima No. 1 power plant, a key step in containing the nuclear crisis, the government's nuclear safety agency said.

Full operation of the newly installed water treatment system was delayed when water was found leaking during a trial run Thursday, but the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said repairs have been completed.

The treated water will eventually be injected into the troubled reactors, whose key cooling functions were knocked out in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, leading to so-called circulating injection cooling.

Tepco is eager to fully activate the water treatment system, as continually injecting water into the reactors from outside has created vast pools of contaminated water in the reactor turbine buildings and nearby areas.

The system, composed of installations developed by Kurion Inc. of the United States and France's Areva SA, will transfer some of the polluted water to a facility on the plant's premises and clean it during several processes, including reducing the amount of cesium and other radioactive substances, and removing oil and other contaminants.

Thursday's leak was found at the Kurion's installation, after a rupture disc component broke when the pressure inside rose dangerously, according to Tepco. A worker may have erroneously touched a lever to operate a valve, resulting in the pressure change, it said.

Once the water treatment system starts operating, the utility plans to decontaminate about 1,200 tons of polluted water per day. Up to 480 tons are expected to be recycled as coolant for the reactors, the agency said.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0110617x1.html
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Old July 11th, 2011, 07:36 PM
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Washington, DC—(ENEWSPF)—July 11, 2011.

No Problems at Fukushima From Weekend Quake

Plant Status

An earthquake of magnitude 7.3 struck northeast Japan Sunday morning, prompting tsunami warnings for the coast, including Fukushima prefecture. Tokyo Electric Power Co. ordered workers at the Fukushima Daiichi plant to move to higher ground and suspended the transfer of low-level contaminated water from the plant to a large steel storage barge. However, no problems at the plant were reported after only a small tsunami wave reached the coast. Cooling water injections into reactors 1, 2 and 3 and nitrogen injections into reactors 1 and 2 continued as normal.

TEPCO suspended operation of its water decontamination system for 12 hours Sunday to repair a leak in the system. The continued operation of the system is crucial to establish a circulatory cooling system for the reactors and to decontaminate and reduce the water accumulating in the reactor building basements. TEPCO has set a July 17 deadline to establish stable cooling for the reactors. As of July 10, the system has treated more than 18,000 metric tons of contaminated water.

TEPCO has confirmed that an entry point is available to allow nitrogen injection into reactor 3’s pressure containment vessel. The injection of the inert gas will help prevent the potential for a hydrogen explosion. TEPCO reported to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency July 11 on its preparations for the injection, which is to be started “as early as possible.”


TEPCO is preparing to restart the fuel pool circulating system for reactor 4, after checking that a kink in the reactor heat removal system piping will not block the flow of water. The system is expected to be in service by the end of July. The company sampled the water in reactor 3’s fuel pool and concluded that boric acid injections have helped to prevent corrosion of the aluminum fuel racks. The issue became a concern when concrete debris in the pool caused the water to become more alkaline.

Industry/Regulatory/Political Issues

A long-term roadmap drafted by Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission and TEPCO calls for the removal of melted fuel from the reactors to begin in 2021, provided the technology required for the task has been developed. Damage to the reactor containment vessels will have to be repaired before the fuel can be removed. Dismantling the reactor buildings after the fuel has been removed will likely take several decades.

TEPCO officials released the results of a detailed simulation of the tsunami that struck the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini plants on March 11. The analysis showed that the wave reached a height of 13 meters (42.7 feet) at the Daiichi plant and 9 meters (29.5 feet) at the Daini plant.

At a press conference Monday clarifying the government’s position on restarting Japanese nuclear reactors, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano stressed that nuclear safety should be given priority over the issue of whether there will be enough electricity to meet demand. Last week Prime Minister Naoto Kan and Minister for Nuclear Crisis Management Goshi Hosono agreed said that “stress tests” assessing the plants’ safety response to severe accidents should be one of the requirements for restarting the reactors, along with routine safety checks. Edano said a first stage would check plants awaiting restart after scheduled maintenance, and the second phase would be for all plants, including those currently operating.

The Japanese government is requesting parliamentary approval of a second supplementary budget of two trillion yen ($24.5 billion) for nuclear damage compensation, health checks and radiation monitoring. A previous supplementary budget was used for accident recovery and debris removal work.

Fukushima prefecture officials are inspecting a cattle farm in Minami-Souma city after elevated levels of radioactive cesium were found in 11 cows shipped from the farm to a Tokyo meat processing firm.

http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/l...y-11-2011.html
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Old July 11th, 2011, 07:39 PM
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So, how has the squid harvest been effected?

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Old July 11th, 2011, 07:45 PM
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So, how has the squid harvest been effected?

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