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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:12 PM
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Default Nuclear Energy Institute Report on Japan's Nuclear Reactors

South Suburban Branch of NAACP Announces Investigation Into Hiring Practices in Village of Flossmoor Côte d’Ivoire: UN-Appointed Probe Finds Serious Rights Abuses After Elections Sudan: UN Reports ‘Extremely Worrying’ Attacks on Civilians in Southern Kordofan Recent Snowpack Declines in the Rocky Mountains Unusual Compared to Past Few Centuries Excite USA Recalls Toy Helicopters Due to Laceration Hazard .Nuclear Energy Institute Report on Japan's Nuclear Reactors, June 9, 2011 .
Friday, 10 June 2011 14:41 Press Release Latest National News .12345( 0 Votes )
Washington, DC—(ENEWSPF)—June 10, 2011 – Update as of 3:30 p.m. EDT.

Test Run Begins for Water Filtration System at Fukushima Daiichi

Plant Status

Starting Friday, June 10, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) will begin a weeklong test run of the new water filtration system it intends to use to decontaminate and reuse the 105,000 tons of highly radioactive water that has flooded the facilities at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The system is expected to reduce concentrations of radioactive materials in the water by a factor of up to 1 million. Oil and salt will be also removed. Contaminated water is accumulating at a rate of 500 tons per day as cooling water is injected into the reactors. The system is expected to treat 1,200 tons of water a day and should aid TEPCO's efforts to control water management issues at the plant. There are growing fears that the contaminated water could otherwise start overflowing the plant basements by late June.

TEPCO reports that two of its workers have received radiation doses exceeding the company’s limit of 25 rem. The results of analyses showed the workers’ total doses were above 60 rem, accompanied by elevated thyroid iodine-131 levels. TEPCO anticipates no acute health effects for the workers, who have been transferred to the Fukushima Daini site. A third TEPCO worker is being evaluated after elevated thyroid radioiodine levels were reported.

The company is again using a concrete pumping truck to spray dust inhibitor on the roof and walls of the turbine buildings of reactors 1 and 2. The dust inhibitor is a synthetic resin that prevents the dispersion of radioactive materials.

TEPCO reports that as summer temperatures climb, the company is improving working conditions for recovery workers at the Fukushima Daiichi site. Eight air-conditioned rest areas are now in operation on-site where workers can temporarily remove their protective gear during rest periods. Four more rest areas are under construction.

Industry/Regulatory/Political Issues
TEPCO is setting up two accident investigation committees, one internal to the company and the other composed of outside experts from Japanese universities, the Tohoku radiological science center and a consumer agency. Both committees are expected to be established by June 11.

About 8,000 schoolchildren in Date City in Fukushima prefecture will be given personal dosimeters to monitor their radiation exposure. Thirty-eight miles from Fukushima Daiichi, the city is currently outside the evacuation zone. However, earlier this month estimated radiation levels at three locations exceeded the government’s evacuation level of 2 rem per year. The town’s mayor decided to take the measure when local parents expressed concerns about their children’s radiation exposure. The Japanese government promised to consider local people’s wishes when deciding to order further evacuations.

The Japanese government’s emergency task force published its preliminary report on lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. Among its recommendations is to establish the independence of Japan’s nuclear regulator, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The report will be presented at a high-level ministerial conference on nuclear safety at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna June 20.

A forum of G8 and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency members this week published their post-Fukushima recommendations for national nuclear regulators. Their report will also be presented at the June 20 IAEA ministerial conference.

Media Highlights
A dozen reporters, including journalists with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg business wire and National Geographic magazine attended the news conference that NEI organized Thursday to announce the formation of a leadership structure among electric sector organizations to coordinate and oversee the industry’s response to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. For more information on the press conference, see The Times’ blog coverage of the press event.

http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/l...ne-9-2011.html
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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:19 PM
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Transcript
ALI MOORE, PRESENTER: Japanese authorities have admitted the crisis at the Fukushima nuclear plant in March may have been worse than a core meltdown.

In an official report that will go to the UN's nuclear watchdog, Japan says nuclear fuel in three reactors possibly melted through several pressure vessels and into the earth below.

As North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy reports, a so-called melt-through is the worst outcome in a nuclear accident.

MARK WILLACY, REPORTER: For the Japanese the news from Fukushima gets worse every day.

This week it went from a reactor meltdown to what they're calling a melt-through.

GOSHI HOSONO, SPECIAL ADVISOR TO JAPANESE PM (Translation): At present there is damage to the bottom of the reactor container, we call this ‘core melting’ in English. Part of the nuclear fuel has fallen onto the dry earth floor and it's possible that it's still lodged there.

MARK WILLACY: According to atomic experts, this is about as serious as it gets in a nuclear disaster. Dangerous levels of radioactive iodine and cesium have already contaminated the sea, the soil, groundwater, and the air.

This week plutonium was detected for the first time outside the stricken plant, and Strontium-90, known as a bone seeker because it can cause bone cancer and Leukaemia, has now been found as far away as 60 kilometres from the facility.

Higher levels were found closer to the plant in Minamisoma, a city of 70,000.

TETSURO FUKUYAMA, GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN (Translation): Hot spots were found, meaning there were certain spots with very high readings of radiation.

MARK WILLACY: In a country built on conformity and compliance, there's now growing criticism of the government's handling of the crisis.

http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/conte...1/s3241508.htm
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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:20 PM
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I'll be surprised if they don't have to replace or bury half the damn plant.
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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by superpsycho View Post
I'll be surprised if they don't have to replace or bury half the damn plant.
I think it is allot more serious than that at this point.
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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:49 PM
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OMG! Real Talk On Danger Of Radiation From Japanese Reactors In Meltdown

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Old June 11th, 2011, 03:26 PM
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Test Run Begins for Water Filtration System at Fukushima Daiichi
Update as of 3:30 p.m. EDT, Friday, June 10

Plant Status

Starting Friday, June 10, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) will begin a weeklong test run of the new water filtration system it intends to use to decontaminate and reuse the 105,000 tons of highly radioactive water that has flooded the facilities at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The system is expected to reduce concentrations of radioactive materials in the water by a factor of up to 1 million. Oil and salt will be also removed. Contaminated water is accumulating at a rate of 500 tons per day as cooling water is injected into the reactors. The system is expected to treat 1,200 tons of water a day and should aid TEPCO's efforts to control water management issues at the plant. There are growing fears that the contaminated water could otherwise start overflowing the plant basements by late June.
TEPCO reports that two of its workers have received radiation doses exceeding the company’s limit of 25 rem. The results of analyses showed the workers’ total doses were above 60 rem, accompanied by elevated thyroid iodine-131 levels. TEPCO anticipates no acute health effects for the workers, who have been transferred to the Fukushima Daini site. A third TEPCO worker is being evaluated after elevated thyroid radioiodine levels were reported.
The company is again using a concrete pumping truck to spray dust inhibitor on the roof and walls of the turbine buildings of reactors 1 and 2. The dust inhibitor is a synthetic resin that prevents the dispersion of radioactive materials.
TEPCO reports that as summer temperatures climb, the company is improving working conditions for recovery workers at the Fukushima Daiichi site. Eight air-conditioned rest areas are now in operation on-site where workers can temporarily remove their protective gear during rest periods. Four more rest areas are under construction.

http://www.nei.org/newsandevents/inf...n-that-region/
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Old June 11th, 2011, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Intense View Post
South Suburban Branch of NAACP Announces Investigation Into Hiring Practices in Village of Flossmoor Côte d’Ivoire: UN-Appointed Probe Finds Serious Rights Abuses After Elections Sudan: UN Reports ‘Extremely Worrying’ Attacks on Civilians in Southern Kordofan Recent Snowpack Declines in the Rocky Mountains Unusual Compared to Past Few Centuries Excite USA Recalls Toy Helicopters Due to Laceration Hazard .Nuclear Energy Institute Report on Japan's Nuclear Reactors, June 9, 2011 .
Friday, 10 June 2011 14:41 Press Release Latest National News .12345( 0 Votes )
Washington, DC—(ENEWSPF)—June 10, 2011 – Update as of 3:30 p.m. EDT.

Test Run Begins for Water Filtration System at Fukushima Daiichi

Plant Status

Starting Friday, June 10, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) will begin a weeklong test run of the new water filtration system it intends to use to decontaminate and reuse the 105,000 tons of highly radioactive water that has flooded the facilities at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The system is expected to reduce concentrations of radioactive materials in the water by a factor of up to 1 million. Oil and salt will be also removed. Contaminated water is accumulating at a rate of 500 tons per day as cooling water is injected into the reactors. The system is expected to treat 1,200 tons of water a day and should aid TEPCO's efforts to control water management issues at the plant. There are growing fears that the contaminated water could otherwise start overflowing the plant basements by late June.

TEPCO reports that two of its workers have received radiation doses exceeding the company’s limit of 25 rem. The results of analyses showed the workers’ total doses were above 60 rem, accompanied by elevated thyroid iodine-131 levels. TEPCO anticipates no acute health effects for the workers, who have been transferred to the Fukushima Daini site. A third TEPCO worker is being evaluated after elevated thyroid radioiodine levels were reported.

The company is again using a concrete pumping truck to spray dust inhibitor on the roof and walls of the turbine buildings of reactors 1 and 2. The dust inhibitor is a synthetic resin that prevents the dispersion of radioactive materials.

TEPCO reports that as summer temperatures climb, the company is improving working conditions for recovery workers at the Fukushima Daiichi site. Eight air-conditioned rest areas are now in operation on-site where workers can temporarily remove their protective gear during rest periods. Four more rest areas are under construction.

Industry/Regulatory/Political Issues
TEPCO is setting up two accident investigation committees, one internal to the company and the other composed of outside experts from Japanese universities, the Tohoku radiological science center and a consumer agency. Both committees are expected to be established by June 11.

About 8,000 schoolchildren in Date City in Fukushima prefecture will be given personal dosimeters to monitor their radiation exposure. Thirty-eight miles from Fukushima Daiichi, the city is currently outside the evacuation zone. However, earlier this month estimated radiation levels at three locations exceeded the government’s evacuation level of 2 rem per year. The town’s mayor decided to take the measure when local parents expressed concerns about their children’s radiation exposure. The Japanese government promised to consider local people’s wishes when deciding to order further evacuations.

The Japanese government’s emergency task force published its preliminary report on lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. Among its recommendations is to establish the independence of Japan’s nuclear regulator, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The report will be presented at a high-level ministerial conference on nuclear safety at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna June 20.

A forum of G8 and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency members this week published their post-Fukushima recommendations for national nuclear regulators. Their report will also be presented at the June 20 IAEA ministerial conference.

Media Highlights
A dozen reporters, including journalists with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg business wire and National Geographic magazine attended the news conference that NEI organized Thursday to announce the formation of a leadership structure among electric sector organizations to coordinate and oversee the industry’s response to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. For more information on the press conference, see The Times’ blog coverage of the press event.

http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/l...ne-9-2011.html
Quite a departure fron Chernoybl (where Chernobyl was just abandoned)...
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Old June 11th, 2011, 03:34 PM
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Will this put Nuclear energy in a different light in design practices according to where they are built? (Not that it matters seeing that the entire planet is prone to Earthquakes...(Just thinking out loud here)...
  #9  
Old June 13th, 2011, 10:07 AM
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TOKYO (Dow Jones)--The governor of Fukui Prefecture said Monday he won't approve the restart of offline nuclear reactors in the prefecture unless the central government clarifies the difference in safety status between the recently closed Hamaoka nuclear power plant and others in the country.

"We are not anti-nuke. We want the government to make clear action plans and a timetable, and show them to people helping Japan's power supply," Governor Issei Nishikawa said in an interview with Dow Jones Newswires, in which he also criticized Prime Minister Naoto Kan for having a "big city" view when it came to his safety stance on nuclear plants.

The failure to restart offline reactors, such as those in the western prefecture of Fukui, also has implications for Japan's power needs, since it may exacerbate expected power shortages this summer. As of Monday, six of 13 reactors in Fukui are idle either for planned or unplanned maintenance, and two more are scheduled to go offline for checkups this summer.

Japanese regulations require reactors to close once every 13 months for maintenance and inspections, a process that usually takes two or three months. Utilities also have safety agreements with local cities and prefectures that require them to inform local governments of plans to restart reactors after such closures, though formal approval of plans is not mandatory.

However, utilities across the nation with offline reactors have chosen not to restart them after the March 11 quake and tsunami, as the subsequent crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant raised safety fears among the public, even though such a stance could lead to power shortages.

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...13-702675.html
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Old June 13th, 2011, 10:10 AM
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TOKYO, June 8 (Reuters) - All 54 of Japan's nuclear reactors may be shut by next April, adding more than $30 billion a year to the country's energy costs, if communities object to plant operating plans due to safety concerns, trade ministry officials said on Wednesday.

Since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, which triggered a radiation crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant north of Tokyo, concern among local authorities has kept nuclear generators from restarting at least four reactors that had been expected to come online after routine maintenance and inspection.

Several more reactors have since shut for regular maintenance, slashing Japan's nuclear generating capacity to just 17,580 megawatts, or only 36 percent of its registered nuclear capacity. [ID:nL3E7GD1AW]

In May, Japan's average nuclear run rate fell to 40.9 percent, the lowest in at least a decade and well below 62.1 percent a year earlier. [ID:nL3E7H80K1]

Before the quake and tsunami, which forced the closure of three other power plants in addition to Tokyo Electric Power Co's Fukushima Daiichi facility, nuclear power supplied about 30 percent of Japan's electricity.

Although a reactor is legally cleared for restart once it receives approval from the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), a trade ministry watchdog, nuclear operators always seek local government approvals as well, in recognition of the importance of support from the community around the plant.

If no reactors that shut for regular maintenance after the disaster are restarted, it would cost an extra 2.4 trillion yen ($30 billion) to make up lost power generation during the financial year to next March, a trade ministry estimate showed.

If all of Japan's reactors end up offline without any restarts, the extra cost would escalate to 3 trillion yen a year, reflecting the need to buy more fossil fuels from abroad while the use of renewable energy remains limited.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7H81N220110609
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